Watch how an animal communicator sheds lights on the feelings of a “ferocious” leopard

This video is 13 minutes long, but I can almost guarantee you that it’s worth your time watching it.

http://www.dizzyturtle.com/animal-communicator-anna/

This black leopard, named Diablo, was deemed to be “too ferocious” and absolutely unapproachable until an animal communicator, Anna Breytenbach, was invited to speak with him.

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What’s most amazing is that Diablo could tell Anna that he wanted his name changed as Diablo had negative connotations and he wasn’t happy with that (animals can sense this). Diablo (his rescuer then changed his name to Spirit) was even able to tell Anna that he was concerned about the two cubs who was with him before he was rescued from the wild. There was no way that Anna could have known about that.

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Named Spirit now, he lives more happily with this rescuer in the sanctuary, knowing there is better understanding between he and his new family.

Capture3All thanks to his amazing animal communicator who broke the barriers between man and “beast” (not used in any derogatory manner, but just as a synonym to mean an animal of the wild).

This reminds me of a case long ago (and yes, I did blog about it too) when an abused dog was rescued in the nick of time from being euthanised. The dog was able to even describe how scared he was of his fosterer who had not treated him well – again, all thanks to the animal communicator who spoke with the dog after he was rescued. This was a case in the Klang Valley and I called the vet to stop the euthanasia when his first family asked for help. I hope the dog is still doing well now.

It also brings home the point that some humans are known to have put down rescued animals deemed “too fierce”, “unfriendly” or “un-rehomable”, without actually understanding why the animals behave in such a manner.

We do have animal communicators in Malaysia. Perhaps it’s time more humans picked up this extraordinary skill of communicating with animals. It could save lives.

For animal lovers and handlers, it’s time we understand them and not be too quick to judge them by our very limited perception. Anthropomorphising can also sometimes lead to more harm than good.

By the way, Mr Zurik says he agrees with my thoughts above. And Cow says he wouldn’t mind speaking with an animal communicator some time, too.

Would Cow like a name change, perhaps?

 

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